DIY

DIY Upholstered Headboard

DIY Upholstered Headboard #theeverygirl

After perusing the Internet for the perfect upholstered headboard, we came to the realization that most of them were pretty expensive. A basic headboard is very simply constructed and doesn't require any crazy wood cuts, so we turned to Blair Culwell of The Fox and She who came up with a simple DIY solution that anyone can recreate. This headboard can be put together in one afternoon and doesn't require anything other than a staple gun. The cost can vary depending on the grade of fabric chosen for the project. Have your hardware store cut the wood for yo  and then assemble everything at home. You can choose any fabric and price point you want to get the look you're going for, and the entire project should only cost around $150 (depending on the cost of fabric) which is significantly less than any store-bought upholstered headboards we've seen.

What You Need:
• 2 2x4s at desired height of headboard from the ground to the top
• 2 2x4s for the width
• 1 piece of plywood
• screws
• screwdriver
• drill bits
• 1/2" thick foam, enough to cover the plywood
• batting to cover the plywood and wrap around for stapling
• upholstery fabric of your choice, same size as batting or slightly larger
• staple gun
• staples

Directions:

1. You'll want to measure your bed and decide how high you want the headboard to be on the wall. Measure from the ground up to the spot on the wall to get your height. Now measure the width of your bed and add a few inches if you want the headboard to go a little over the sides of the bed. Now you have the height and width of the frame, and you'll now need the plywood height! You also want to make sure the headboard extends below your bed, so measure from the spot on the wall where the headboard hits and measure down behind your bed a few inches.

2. In an area that's okay to get a little messy, lay down your 2x4s to create the basic frame. Place the plywood on top and line up all your edges. You want the sides and top flush with the 2x4s to create a crisp edge.

3. In an area that's okay to get a little messy, lay down your 2x4s to create the basic frame. Place the plywood on top and line up all your edges. You want the sides and top flush with the 2x4s to create a crisp edge. Use a drill bit to create holes for the screws. Then screw each piece through. I might have gone overboard on screws, but I'd rather do that than have it fall on my head at night. Once the plywood is securely attached to the 2x4s, ask a friend to help you stand it up and move it out of the way for a bit. In an area that's okay to get a little messy, lay down your 2x4s to create the basic frame. Place the plywood on top and line up all your edges. You want the sides and top flush with the 2x4s to create a crisp edge.

4. Use a drill bit to create holes for the screws. Then screw each piece through. I might have gone overboard on screws, but I'd rather do that than have it fall on my head at night. Once the plywood is securely attached to the 2x4s, ask a friend to help you stand it up and move it out of the way for a bit.

5. Next you'll want to lay down your batting and then the foam pieces on top of that. Again, you want the foam to be flush with the edges. Even if the foam has irregular sides, get it as close as possible. The batting will round out the edges. Cut the corner pieces at angles like shown and then tightly wrap the batting around and staple it down. Continue to tightly pull and wrap the batting around the entire frame until you have it all stapled down. Note: Do not staple the batting to the edge, only the backside of the frame. Cut the corner pieces at angles like shown and then tightly wrap the batting around and staple it down. Continue to tightly pull and wrap the batting around the entire frame until you have it all stapled down. Note: Do not staple the batting to the edge, only the backside of the frame.

6. Again, have a friend help you stand it up while you lay down your fabric of choice. Make sure the work surface is clean before laying it down, or put down a cloth or towels to protect it. Lay down the frame again with the backside facing up. Again, cut diagonally at the corners and start pulling tightly and stapling. I went a little heavier on the staples for the fabric than I did for the batting just to make sure it was safely attached.

7. If your frame has a place to attach the headboard, drill holes at the bottom at the same height from the ground as the holes and attach to the frame with a nut and bolt. And voila!

For more DIYs, visit The Fox and She.

Credits

Blair Culwell #theeverygirl

Blair Culwell

DIY Contributor